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Stationery Design Now!

Stationery Design Now!

If you’re in search of a little stationery design inspiration, Stationery Design Now! is worth a look.

Stationery Design Now!

Stationery Design Now!

It starts with a short essay titled “Death of the Letterhead?” Here’s an excerpt:

“All over the world, postal letter traffic is falling away drastically. America’s postal service, for example, saw a drop in postal mail volume of almost 14% in the year to September 2009. Analysts have predicted that European postal traffic will drop by half over the next 10 years. So isn’t email easier and cheaper, more convenient, more current anyway? While email certainly won’t go away soon, most of us will admit to a small thrill when we get a real letter in the post, especially if it was written by hand.

“After organising a conference recently, I received quite a number of congratulatory emails. One piece of communication made a big difference though: one of our speakers sent me a letter on his own beautifully designed letterhead, with a hand-written note stating merely, ‘Great conference — thanks for inviting me to speak!’ This small gesture meant a lot.”
— JAY RUTHERFORD

Jay Rutherford is chair of visual communications at Bauhaus University Weimar. In the book his essay is translated into German and French, with all versions appearing before the stationery projects.

Stationery Design Now!

Stationery Design Now!
(above) Client: 1/1 DESIGN. Year: 2009. Design: Base.

Stationery Design Now!
(above left) Client: 9MYLES. Year: 2004. Design: 9MYLES.
(above right) Client: 3 Beat Records. Year: 2008. Design: huvi.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: 19 Entertainment Ltd. Year: 2009. Design: Zip Design. Team: David Bowden.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: Aeroplano. Year: 2006. Design: NNSS.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: Amped. Year: 2008. Design: huvi.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: Bideawee. Year: 2007. Design: Carbone Smolan Agency. Team: Leslie Smolan, Nina Masuda.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: Becka Oakley. Year: 2008. Design: huvi.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: Bullerei. Year: 2009. Design: weissraum.de(sign). Team: Bernd Brink, Lucas Buchholz.

Stationery Design Now!
Client: Karen Karch. Year: 2006. Design: Base.

Stationery Design Now!

Stationery Design Now!

Published by TASCHEN Books and edited by Julius Wiedemann, there are 350 pages of stationery projects by a variety of designers/studios. Besides the introductory essay, there’s no description or explanation of the projects. You’ll like this book if you enjoy gallery-style tomes, and if you like looking at the work of other designers from a purely aesthetic viewpoint.

Purchase Stationery Design Now:

on TASCHEN
on Amazon.com
on Amazon.co.uk
on Amazon.ca

Looking for more? A few good books.

My second book on Amazon

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16 comments about “Stationery Design Now!”

  1. This looks like a brilliant book for inspiration and I’ve already gone onto amazon and purchased a copy. Thanks for sharing with us.

  2. David Airey suggested a book!….. muuuuustt……. buy…… now!

  3. Slightly off topic, but I’m getting increasingly frustrated by the number of my clients asking for their stationary to be laid out in Microsoft Word onto which they can then overwrite their letters and email to their customers for printing out of a local office laserwriter.

    I only do it after a prolonged argument and the client has applied the thumb screws to my fingers. They won’t even accept a neatly laid-out letter in InDesign which is then PDF’d and attached to the email, because THIER customer has requested Word as the file format (usually because they don’t know you can copy and paste text from a PDF).

    Anyone else having this problem?

  4. This book looks great. Stationery design can sometimes become very monotonous – it can be hard to find new solutions to the same problems! Might go get a copy of this.

  5. This caught my eye instantly when flipping through my RSS feeds. Thanks for sharing – that’s a beautiful book.

  6. Nice book! Thanks for sharing, David. I’ve got quite a collection of inspirational design books as well as a huge stack to read. If I pick up doing more stationary design, I may grab the book.

  7. Ah, this is just what I needed! Once again, your blog has provided the answer man. I’ve compiling a range resource books lately so I can get stuck into graphic design. It all started with your book though David, thanks again.

  8. It looks like quite a fascinating book.

    Aside from the design work it contains, I just love the round corners! The elastic binder is a nice touch, too.

    …Reminds me of a Moleskine notebook, only printed.

  9. Thankfully, Jon, not recently, but I reckon it’s an occurrence at some stage or another for all designers dealing with clients.

  10. Nice post, the book looks really inspiring.

  11. Had this book delivered yesterday and it’s definitely a book that needs to go on all designers list of things to get. It’s crammed with inspirational pieces for all things related with stationery but the ideas seen throughout the book presents a whirl of inspiration for any project that you may be doing.

    Thanks for the post David, this book now sits proudly on my bookshelf.

  12. Not only does it look very useful, that’s a beautifully designed book in itself.

    It’s one of the few graphic design books actually tempting me for a purchase.

  13. Hi David,
    How does one go about creating ‘designed’ stationeries; letterheads, invoice and such? I design using Illustrator or InDesign but always find it hard to give the client a practical solution to use in Word, Excel etc. It ends up messy. Any thoughts on the issue would be appreciated. Thanks.

  14. Hi azlif, Word’s never easy, particularly as different versions can hijack the layout. Have your client run the pre-printed stationery through an in-house printer to keep everything in check.

  15. Hi david, thanks for the reply.

    The thing with most clients where im at (Maldives) is that they dont usually
    want to bother thinking about spending on a pre-printed layout with a unique stock which probably cant get from their office. This being the situation its mostly the ‘World’ file they need which is where the trouble comes. I guess there is no easy way around this!

  16. You could choose to work with clients who invest a bit more in their printed appearance. There’s no need to restrict yourself to the Maldives.

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