David Airey is an independent graphic designer working with companies of all sizes since 2005.

Damn Good

Damn Good

“Brimming with inspiration, Damn Good highlights the favorite work of designers around the globe, showcasing their best and most passionate projects. This unique and diverse collection challenges the status quo and typical industry boundaries, and also contains the stories behind the work — in the words of the creative teams who designed them.”
— FROM THE BLURB

Damn Good

Damn Good

Damn Good

Damn Good

Damn Good

Yoghurty’s is a new self-service frozen yoghurt concept launching in Canada. Jump wanted to create a logo with classic styling that would also be at home in a modern environment, commissioning several illustrations to be used throughout a wide range of signage, packaging, collateral, and on the website.

Firm: Jump Branding & Design, Toronto, ON, Canada
Client: Yoghurty’s

Damn Good

Newton Running, based in Boulder, Colorado, is striving to produce shoes that have a very low impact on the environment. The company also wanted to look at the way the shoes were packaged and explore an alternative to the conventional printed cardboard boxes. The new package is a moulded design that uses 100% post-consumer recycled material. The shape of the carton fits the shoe, eliminating the need to pack it with tissue paper. Instead of stuffing the shoes with even more paper, the company includes a pair of socks in one and a reusable shoe bag in the other.

Firm: TDA_Boulder, Boulder, CO, USA
Client Newton Running

Damn Good

Palomino has been a Seattle staple for 20 years. They decided it was time for a refresh and gave Superbig the opportunity to overhaul the brand across all touchpoints, including logo, menus, interior, advertising, website and messaging.

Firm: Superbig, Seattle, WA, USA (view the Palomino project)
Client: Restaurants Unlimited

Damn Good

The brand identity for ITI was featured previously on here on Identity Designed.

Firm: Heydays, Oslo, Norway
Client: ITI

Damn Good

Christmas by Colour is a not-for-profit exploration into the colours that shape our Christmas.

Firm: Raw Design Studio, Salford, Manchester, UK
Client: self-promotion

Damn Good

Damn Good — a great book if you want some design inspiration. The work between the covers spans 35 countries, and features many more designers and studios than those listed in the above image.

The book was created by Tim Lapetino and Jason Adam of Chicago and LA-based design firm Hexanine, and published by HOW Books. You can pick up a copy from HOW or through the following links:

on Amazon.com
on Amazon.co.uk
on Amazon.ca

More recommended books here.

My second book on Amazon

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10 comments about “Damn Good”

  1. Pretty cool. I love the typography. <3

  2. Interesting looking book. May have to buy this for my design friend as a birthday present.

  3. Why are you not featured in that Damn Good big chief?

  4. Interesting logo on your site, Harry. Looks strangely like the one Chris Spooner designed for Vivid Ways.

    Rumours of a sequel, Ian — Bloody Brilliant.

  5. Awesome book! I’ve always had an affinity for the Atari logo. =P

    Nice catch on that logo rip off David, I just can’t stand what some people will do to other people’s great ideas. =/

  6. Thank you very much for the book review!

  7. This is not only a great design source book but also a brilliant piece of design in its own right. OK there are some old classics we have seen before but there’s a lot of new work too.

  8. My all-time favorite that you shared with your readers a few years back is the barbed wire “middle finger” – an instant classic!

  9. Another great looking design book for my ever increasing wishlist :)

    Like the idea of the ‘Christmas by Colour’ very clever, looks like some great work featured.

  10. Thanks for all the comments, everyone. With the book we were really seeking to create a design inspiration volume that was different that the typical — including some of the “usual suspects” but also drawing from a lot of work, and places, most of us haven’t seen before.

    It means a lot to us that designers are enjoying the collection.

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